International Women’s Day 2022: three women in science share their stories – Cancer Research UK

To reach our goal of beating cancer sooner we need diverse teams of the most talented researchers working together to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer. Unfortunately, even though percentages of women in science have increased in nearly all fields over the last 10 years, women still face barriers to progressing to more senior roles. For …

Watch: “To women everywhere, dare to believe that you can make a difference” – Cancer Research UK

Scroll down to watch now. This International Women’s Day, meet the women combining research and clinical expertise with business acumen and personal experience to help combat breast cancer. Breast cancer outcomes have improved drastically over the past 20 years, with around 8 in 10 people surviving their disease for 10 years or more, compared with …

Paving the way: How biopsies are offering hope to children with aggressive brain tumours – Cancer Research UK

“Our motivation for studying it is because there haven’t been any new effective treatments for decades.” Overall, survival for children’s cancers in the UK has more than doubled since the 1970s. Today around 8 in 10 children diagnosed with cancer will survive. We have come a long way. But for some cancer types, progress has …

Why diversity in STEM is vital to cancer research – Cancer Research UK

Following the publication of the government’s R&D People & Culture Strategy, the House of Commons Science & Technology Committee launched an inquiry into underrepresentation in STEM. Cancer Research UK has an important role in fostering a diverse and inclusive research environment, and here we give a brief summary of our response to the consultation and …

First data in a decade highlights ethnic disparities in cancer – Cancer Research UK

The first analysis in over 10 years looking at which ethnic groups in England are more likely to get cancer has now been published by Cancer Research UK analysts. The research shows rates of some cancers vary by ethnicity. White people in England, are more than twice as likely to get some types of cancer, …